SALE! Enter code 30off for 30% OFF our Pixie Cup Combo Pack or Pixie Cup Luxe Combo Pack! Shop Combo.

Use 30off for 30% off Combo Packs!  Shop

Can you sleep with a menstrual cup?

Can you sleep with a menstrual cup?

One of the most common questions we receive about menstrual cups is, “Can you sleep with a menstrual cup?”

The short answer is, yes! Not only is it perfectly safe to sleep with a menstrual cup, you will also probably wake up to fewer leaks and less mess! Gone are the days of having to wash your underwear in the sink or getting unsightly mattress stains because your pad shifted or bunched up during the night or just wasn’t big enough. *insert wild cheering*

sleep with menstrual cup

Menstrual cups can be safely worn for up to 12 hours, so there’s no reason they can’t be left in overnight. That said, there are some steps you can take to reduce the risk of leaking during the night, especially if you have a heavy flow.

1. Use the right menstrual cup

Finding the best menstrual cup for your body can make all the difference when it comes to making your menstrual cup pop open and preventing leaks.

Everyone is different, so don’t assume that what works for your friend will work for you. Some people find that a cup made from a more rigid material will pop open more easily. If you have a tilted uterus or a low cervix, you may find that a smaller cup made of a more flexible material works best for you. If this all sounds confusing, don’t worry! We have a handy guide to help you find the best menstrual cup for your body.

2. Take size into consideration

If you know you have a heavy flow, you may want to choose a larger menstrual cup, especially to wear at night. Our largest cup is our Pixie Cup XL, which holds 35ml of fluid. That’s the equivalent of 7 tampons! With that much capacity, you can rest and sleep undisturbed without worrying about getting up in the middle of the night to empty your cup. You can also wear a smaller cup during the day and a larger one at night if you’re worried about leaks.

3. Empty your cup before bed

You should empty and clean your menstrual cup at least every 12 hours — possibly more often if you have a heavy flow. We recommend emptying your cup right before bed so you can sleep as long as possible without needing to remove your cup.

4. Use a little extra protection

Some of us have such a heavy flow that it’s near impossible to avoid leaks overnight. If this is you, it might be a good idea to invest in a pair of period underwear or some reusable Pixie Pads to guarantee that you don’t wake up to a mess.

5. Ease your cramps with essential oils

Sometimes it isn’t the flow so much as those darn cramps that wake you up in the middle of the night. Try easing your cramps with a little essential oil blend on your stomach before bed. Many women also find that when they stop using tampons and switch to a menstrual cup, their menstrual cramps improve.

6. Get a good night’s sleep

Getting a good night’s sleep is essential for your overall health and wellbeing. It’s common to have difficulty sleeping during your period. Worrying about leaks is just one of the things that can interfere with sleep during menstruation. Fluctuating hormones and changes in body temperature can also make it hard to sleep through the night. If this sounds like you, check out our blog on how to sleep better on your period.

We hope these tips are helpful to you as you transition into using a menstrual cup! If you still have questions about sleeping with a menstrual cup, let us know! We absolutely love hearing from you. We will answer your questions to the best of our abilities. And don’t forget, we offer a 100% Happiness Guarantee and we stick by it. If you purchase a Pixie Cup and aren’t completely satisfied, we’ll help you find one that works or give you a refund.

shop now banner

This content was originally written on February 25, 2019, and has been updated for freshness, accuracy, and comprehensiveness.

“Help, I think it’s stuck!” How to remove your menstrual cup

“Help, I think it’s stuck!” How to remove your menstrual cup

“Help, I think my menstrual cup is stuck!” If you’re experiencing a “stuck” menstrual cup, don’t panic! Take a deep breath and relax. We’re here to help.

It’s important to remember that your menstrual cup can only go so far before it reaches your cervix, and guess what? That’s the end of the tunnel. There’s nowhere else for it to go. Your menstrual cup can’t migrate into your uterus or get “lost” inside you.

That said, sometimes it can be hard to get a grip on your cup or break the seal. This can happen if the cup migrates further up in the vaginal canal, or if it forms a seal right up against your cervix.

If this happens to you, you may be tempted to call your doctor or head to the emergency room. Before you do, try our tips for removing a stuck menstrual cup.

1. Relax and breathe

It can be scary and frustrating when you can’t get your cup out, especially if this has never happened to you before. However, many menstrual cup users have experienced this at one time or another, and have gone on to use their cup happily for many years. 

The best thing you can do right now is relax. That may feel impossible if you’ve been fighting with a stuck cup, but take a moment to just breathe. If you’re too tense, all of your muscles will be contracted, and it will make it harder for your cup to come out. 

If you need to step away for a few minutes and regroup, go ahead. Do some breathing exercises, make a cup of tea, or do whatever else you need to calm down. It’s okay if your cup has already been in for 12 hours. Nothing bad is going to happen if you need to wait a little longer.

2. Take a squat

When you’re ready to try again, it may be helpful to get into a squatting position. Get as low as you can to the ground. This will allow you to reach further into your vaginal canal. You can also lift one foot up onto the edge of the toilet or bathtub.

Before you get started, make sure your hands are clean and dry. The drier your hands are, the easier it will be to get a grip on the cup. If the base of the cup is close to the vaginal opening, you could even use a little bit of toilet paper to dry it off.

3. Don’t bear down

You may have read some advice to bear down when you’re trying to get your cup out, but we don’t recommend this. Bearing down when under stress is not good for all the organs and muscles in the pelvic region.

When you have a bowel movement or are giving birth, your muscles work together naturally, and are not being forced. Some reports indicate that improper removal of a menstrual cup could be linked to prolapse of the pelvic muscles, although this has not been proven.

4. Gently break the seal

To properly remove your cup, you need to break the seal that it formed when you inserted it. DO NOT yank on your cup and attempt to pull it straight out. Pulling on a sealed cup will strain the pelvic muscles.

There are two ways to break the seal:

  1. Pinch the base of the cup. Grab the cup as far up as possible and pinch it. You may want to squeeze it for a few seconds to allow the seal to release. If you can’t quite get a hold of the cup, grab the stem and wiggle the cup back and forth a bit (don’t pull) until you’re able to grab the base. Listen for the sound of air leaking, which means the seal is broken.
  2. If that doesn’t work, try inserting one finger up along the side of your menstrual cup and feel for the rim of the cup. Gently push in the rim, similar to the process used for the punch-down fold, until you hear the seal break. This can allow some fluid to leak out, so it’s best to do this when sitting on the toilet or squatting in the shower.

Once the seal is broken, tip the cup a little bit to allow more air into the vagina, and try wiggling your cup out or removing it at an angle.

If that doesn’t work, try a different position. Sometimes changing position can make all the difference. If you’ve been squatting, try putting one foot up on the edge of the bathtub instead.

5. DO NOT use random items to remove your cup

However tempting it might be to grab tweezers or a spoon or something on your bathroom counter to help you reach your cup, don’t do it! The vaginal canal is a sensitive area, and you don’t want to risk injuring yourself or causing infection.

Still can’t get your cup out?

If you’ve tried all these steps — and made sure to relax and breathe — and you still can’t get your cup out, it may be time to call your doctor. Remember that not all gynecologists are familiar with menstrual cups, and you may need to tell your doctor not to attempt to pull it straight out. Also, don’t let your doctor throw your cup away! There’s no reason it can’t be sanitized and reused.

Make sure you have the right size

If you frequently have trouble getting your cup out, it could mean that your cup is the wrong size. If you have a higher cervix but are using a shorter cup, the cup may migrate further up in the vagina and be hard to reach.

Measuring your cervix can help you choose the right cup for you.

At Pixie Cup, we offer several shapes and sizes to help everyone find the perfect fit. All of our bodies are different, so it makes sense that there’s no one-size-fits-all when it comes to menstrual cups. Learn how to find the best menstrual cup for your body.

We also offer a 100% happiness guarantee. If you buy a Pixie Cup and it isn’t the right size or it otherwise doesn’t work for you, we’ll work with you to find one that works or refund your money! We want everyone to experience true period freedom, and your happiness is our priority.

Check out our different menstrual cups and menstrual cup accessories in our store.

shop now banner

This content was originally written on February 19, 2019, and has been updated for freshness, accuracy, and comprehensiveness.

It’s time to get rid of menstrual cup leaks

It’s time to get rid of menstrual cup leaks

Leaks. This just might be the greatest fear that lurks in the mind of the Pixie Cup user wannabe. What if my cup leaks? What can I do then?

Menstrual cups offer countless benefits over disposable menstrual products. Not only can they be worn for up to 12 hours at a time and reduce your exposure to harmful chemicals and toxins, they also save you money and reduce waste. Many cup users also report positive side effects such as shorter periods and less cramping. But menstrual cups can take some getting used to, and if you’re a new user, it’s not uncommon to experience some menstrual cup leaking.

We hear from many women who are frustrated that their menstrual cup is leaking, even if it’s only been in for a few hours. They often think this means that menstrual cups just don’t work for them or won’t provide the hassle-free, leak-proof solution they’re looking for.

Check out our assortment of menstrual cup lube, wipes, and other accessories. Order now and receive free shipping on orders of $25 or more!

menstrual cup leaking

Why is my menstrual cup leaking?

Before you read any further, we want you to know one thing. It may take a little time to get used to your cup and learn how to use it. Sometimes leaks will happen during that adjustment time, but this doesn’t necessarily mean that you have the wrong cup or that you can’t use cups. It’s simply a learning period.

Factors such as how you fold or insert your cup, the position of your cervix, and where your cup sits in the vaginal canal can all affect how well it works. So, give yourself and your cup a little grace and keep trying until you find a leak-free system that works for you! We can promise that it will be 100% worth it.

That said, there are sometimes specific factors that may contribute to menstrual cup leaking. Take a look at these 10 reasons for menstrual cup leaks and learn how to fix them.

10 reasons for menstrual cup leaks

1. Your cup is positioned incorrectly

Improper insertion is the most common cause of menstrual cup leaking. The vaginal canal isn’t straight up and down; it’s angled toward the back. So as you insert your cup, make sure you direct it back toward the rear instead of straight up. It may also help to change your position while you insert the cup. Some women find it easier to squat, or stand with one leg on the toilet seat. Whichever position you choose, make sure your muscles are as relaxed, because tense muscles will make inserting your cup much harder.

2. Your cup didn’t open fully

how to stop menstrual cup leaking

After your cup is inserted, slide your finger around the rim of the cup to make sure that it’s popped open. If you feel a fold or dip in the cup, this means it didn’t fully open. Simply twist the cup clockwise or counterclockwise and the cup should pop open. If that doesn’t work, you can try sliding the cup up and down a little bit as well, or use a different fold. Sometimes the the punch down fold doesn’t work as well as the C fold or 7 fold. Learn more about folds

3. Your cup is the wrong size

If your cup is too small for you, it might not create a tight seal and instead slide down in your vaginal canal. This could allow fluid to leak around the edge of the cup. Another less common option is sometimes the cup could be too big, and not completely unfolding. We have several different cup sizes to make sure you have options!

4. You aren’t using lubricant

If you’re having trouble with leaks, a little water-based lubricant could go a long way! A smooth insertion will help your cup open easier. We created a Pixie Cup Lubricant that is perfect for your cup! It’s hypoallergenic, made with simple ingredients, and specifically formulated so it won’t cause any damage to your silicone cup.

5. You need to insert your cup dry

If lubrication doesn’t help, maybe you have the opposite problem! Some women find that inserting their cup dry creates a more secure seal. Make sure your cup is nice and dry before inserting, and see if that takes care of leaks.

6. You’re not emptying your cup enough

We often hear from women who say their menstrual cup is leaking after only a few hours. You might be thinking, It hasn’t been 12 hours yet, and my cup is overflowing! Is something wrong?

Not at all! Your cup is safe for use for up to 12 hours, but sometimes — on your heavier days or if you have a heavier period — it might be necessary to empty it more often. This is completely normal. Just like tampons, a menstrual cup can last for different periods of time for different people. If you find that you’re having to empty your menstrual cup often, try a larger size, like our Pixie Cup XL.

7. You have strong pelvic floor muscles

menstrual cup with strong pelvic floor muscles

While strong pelvic floor muscles offer many health benefits, they can also squeeze your cup, causing a half-full cup to overflow. If this is you, just change your cup just a little more often on your heavy flow days.

8. The air holes are blocked

The air holes around the rim of your cup are there to create a good seal, so if these are blocked, it’s possible that you could experience some leaks. If your cup is leaking, check and make sure the air holes are clean before inserting your cup. Our post about getting rid of the menstrual cup smell contains some tips for removing the buildup from air holes … check it out!

9. You have residual fluid on your vaginal walls

Sometimes you might think your cup is leaking, but it’s really just a bit of residual fluid from your vaginal walls. This is more likely to happen on the heavier days of your period. Just grab a wipe and clean out the extra residue so that it doesn’t leak out after you insert your cup.

10. Your cervix is tilted

Pixie Menstrual Cup LeakingFor most people, the cervix is usually positioned centrally, which allows all fluid to flow directly into the cup. Your cervix does move during menstruation, however, and if your cervix is tilted or positioned against the wall of your vagina, this could cause the fluid to run down the vaginal wall. The same thing can happen if you have a tilted or retroverted uterus.

If you think your cervix isn’t lined up with the cup or it’s touching the rim after inserting, take your cup out and reinsert it. It also might help to let your cup sit below your cervix, or to open the cup lower in the vagina to catch the extra flow.

Clearly, there are a lot of factors that affect how well your menstrual cup works. This may all seem overwhelming, but don’t get discouraged! After a few cycles with your menstrual cup, it will all become second nature, and you’ll never want to go back to pads and tampons! We’ve helped many cup users find the perfect fit, so if you’ve tried these suggestions and you’re still experiencing leaks, get in touch!

Check out our assortment of menstrual cup lube, wipes, and other accessories. Order now and receive free shipping on orders of $25 or more!

Shop menstrual cups

This content was originally written on April 15, 2019, and has been updated for freshness, accuracy, and comprehensiveness.

How to go hiking, backpacking, and camping on your period

How to go hiking, backpacking, and camping on your period

Has this ever happened to you? You’re planning an expedition into the wilderness … But as you sketch out the perfect weekend full of adventure, you suddenly panic, realizing that you picked the dreaded period week. Can you really go camping on your period, or should you reschedule your trip?

Don’t worry — it is possible to go hiking, backpacking, or camping on your period. And once you’ve done it, you’ll realize it’s not that big a deal. But first, make sure you read over this blog post because there is a right way and a wrong way to deal with your period in the wilderness.

With a little advanced preparation, you’ll be ready to head out for adventure at any time of the month!

How to prepare for camping on your period

The most important thing for a camping trip while on your period is to be prepared and pack everything you need. When you are planning your trip, take the time to think through what you might need on the trail. After all, this is your one opportunity to grab what you need before you are roughin’ it in the wilderness!

One of the best options for camping on your period is a menstrual cup. If you’ve never used one, now may be the perfect time to switch! Many women find that menstrual cups are ideal for camping, because they’re reusable, create less waste, and don’t need to be changed every few hours like pads and tampons.

Menstrual cups are flexible silicone or rubber cups that are worn inside the vagina to collect menstrual fluid. Depending on your flow and other factors such as the size of the cup, a menstrual cup can be worn for up to 12 hours. Then, you simply remove your cup, empty the contents, clean the cup, and re-insert it.

Ready to try a menstrual cup? Shop our online store!

Why use a menstrual cup when camping?

1. Menstrual cups are reusable

You’ll never have to worry about running out of tampons, or forgetting to bring enough pads for your travels! Menstrual cups are durable and accessible. You only need one, and you can reuse it over and over!

2. Menstrual cups are waste-free

If you know anything about camping in the wilderness, you probably are aware of the phrase “Leave No Trace.” The Leave No Trace principles are to keep nature thriving and care for the earth, as well as to be considerate of others who come behind you. One of the principles of Leave No Trace is to dispose of all waste properly. In many cases, this means packing it out with you.

When you camp on your period with a menstrual cup, you avoid the question of “bury it or pack it out?” Nobody wants to lug a ziplock bag of used period waste around. With your menstrual cup, you only have to bury the contents!

3. Menstrual cups give you a lot more time for adventure

A regular tampon holds about 5ml of blood, while the small Pixie Cup Luxe holds 20ml, and the large size holds 25ml! You can wear a menstrual cup for up to 12 hours, so you don’t have to take time away from your adventures to change your pad or tampon.

camping on your period

Cons of using menstrual cups while camping

1. Menstrual cups require some practice

If you aren’t used to using a menstrual cup, you may not want to use it for the first time on a camping trip. If your cup isn’t properly inserted, you may experience some leaks.

If possible, plan ahead and use your cup for a few cycles before your camping trip so you can get used to it. It’s also important to choose the right cup for your body. Every body is different, which is why we’ve designed the Pixie Cup in several different styles and sizes. Learn more about choosing the right cup for your body.

If you’re worried about leaks, you can bring along some thin reusable pads such as our Pixie Pads, which won’t take up much room in your pack.

2. Menstrual cups require sanitary conditions

You’ll want to make sure your hands are clean and sanitized before removing or inserting your menstrual cup. We make this easier with products such as our Pixie Cup Wash and Pixie Cup Wipes.

How to use a menstrual cup when camping

So, how do you use a menstrual cup while camping? As it turns out, the technique is pretty simple!

Step 1: Make sure you sanitize

This is absolutely essential, girls! You’ll want to make sure your cup is well-sanitized with boiling water before you head out on your adventure, and make sure your hands are clean and sanitized before you remove your cup to empty it. Do not forget this step! You can sanitize your hands with some water from your water bottle and a little soap, or with some Pixie Wash and water.

Step 2: Bury the contents

When you empty your cup, empty the contents in a 6-8 inch cathole that is at least 200 feet from a water source. The easiest way to do this is to bring a small trowel with you. Simply empty the fluid from your cup into the hole, and use water from your bottle to rinse your cup. When you are finished, replace extra dirt in the hole, and disguise the area with leaves or brush. Make sure you wash or sanitize your hands when you’re finished!

Step 3: Boil your cup after your period

If your camping trip lasts longer than your period, make sure you sanitize your cup thoroughly with boiling water (be careful!) before packing it away.

Using pads and tampons when camping

If pads and tampons are what you’re used to, or you haven’t gotten the hang of using a menstrual cup, you can continue to use pads and tampons when camping. But you’ll need to make sure to follow backcountry guidelines and dispose of your waste properly.

How to camp with pads and tampons

  1. Make sure you bring enough supplies to cover your entire period. Just like when you’re at home, you may want to bring supplies in different sizes and absorbencies.
  2. Be prepared to pack out your waste. Tampons and pads should not be buried, as they don’t decompose quickly, and animals could dig them up. If you’re using pads and tampons when camping, bring a designated waste bag to keep them in until you reach an area with a proper trash receptacle.

Additional menstrual supplies for camping

Whether you’re using a menstrual cup or disposable products, we recommend bringing plenty of hand sanitizer and extra water for washing your hands. If you’re using a menstrual cup, bring a small bar of unscented soap or container of Pixie Cup Wash, and moistened paper towels or Pixie Wipes to give your cup a quick cleaning during the trek.

You may also want to bring along a few medical gloves to use when removing and inserting your menstrual cup, especially if your camping conditions will make it hard to wash your hands. These will create extra waste, so only use them if absolutely necessary, and put them in your waste bag to pack out with you.

Bonus Tip: Bring essential oils and pain reliever.

As we all know, periods are more than just a pain in the you-know-where to clean up… they are also literally painful sometimes. Make sure you pack some pain reliever, or a few drops of peppermint essential oil (diluted with a carrier oil like coconut oil) in a travel container, to ease bloating and cramping.

We hope this helps you feel equipped to have a fantastic trip! Curious about menstrual cups? Sign up for our newsletter and receive 10% off your first order! Plus, you’ll be the first to know about contests, giveaways, and special promotions!

This content was originally written on April 22, 2019, and has been updated for freshness, accuracy, and comprehensiveness.

Can a virgin use a menstrual cup?

Can a virgin use a menstrual cup?

This question is very common, so don’t feel alone if you’re hesitant about using a menstrual cup as a virgin!

There are only two things that could cause a virgin to experience difficulty using a menstrual cup.

Your own comfortability.

First, you need to assess your own mind and see if you feel comfortable with the thought of using an internal period product. If you are unfamiliar or uncomfortable with your vagina and have never used a tampon, make sure to take time to relax. Take it slow and give yourself some grace to figure it out! We believe in you, and we wholeheartedly recommend a menstrual cup to every girl because it truly is a life-changer! Imagine swimming, riding a bike, and running without fear of leaks and stains!

Your flexibility.

virgin menstrual cup

First of all, your body is more resilient and strong than you could imagine! Your vaginal canal was created to expand when needed, and then return to its normal state, without stretching out! Otherwise, how could we women ever achieve a vaginal birth? 

That being said, if you have never used a tampon or inserted anything into your vaginal canal, it could feel a bit uncomfortable at first. We advise you to start with a smaller cup and apply a little lubricant (we sell a really smooth Pixie Cup Lube that is AMAZING) to help you experience a comfortable insertion.

We also recommend that you start with the “Punch Down Fold.” For this fold, place your index finger on the top of the rim and press inwards to the base of the cup forming a triangle.

One of the most frequently asked questions we get from new cup users is, “Can my cup get stuck up there?” If you are concerned about that possibility, check out our blog post on menstrual cup removal, HERE!

There are two more things you need to know if you are considering a menstrual cup as a virgin:

  1. Your hymen may stretch.

First, we need to address what your hymen is NOT. It is not a film deep inside your vaginal canal that stretches across the opening and must be broken during sexual intercourse. Your hymen is an outer layer that partially covers your vaginal canal and it can be stretched by doing all kinds of things including something as simple as riding a bike. Your vaginal canal itself does not stretch, but the hymen could.

  1. You cannot lose your virginity to a menstrual cup.

Your virginity is not based on a thin piece of skin, it is a simple fact about your life experience. You are a virgin if you have not had sexual intercourse, and that fact has nothing to do with a menstrual cup, or your hymen for that matter. Women all over the world struggle with the question of whether or not it is acceptable in their religion or culture to use a menstrual cup. We deeply desire for each woman to have the freedom and the right to use a menstrual cup and experience the joy and ease that it can bring to her life. We need to be the voice that tells the world that the value of a woman is not determined by the state of her hymen, but by the existence of her soul.

Win this fabulous fall giveaway!

 

We're giving away some fantastic items from some of our absolute favorite brands — all the things you need for a fabulous fall adventure!